Source: British Museum

Source: British Museum

Kanga: A type of textile popular in East Africa, especially in Kenya and Tanzania. It is a rectangular-shaped cotton cloth that is about the size of a beach towel, and is usually worn by women (but sometimes men). A typical kanga in East Africa consists of a wider border (Swahili: pindo), the central motif (Swahili: mji), and the writing (Swahili: ujumbe or jina)." 
Source: Swahili Language and Culture


Kente Cloth - Source: Metropolitan Museum

Kente Cloth - Source: Metropolitan Museum

Kente Cloth, or Asante Kente: a fabric made by Asante and Ewe people in Ghana, which has brightly colored geometric patterns. Source: Philadelphia Museum


Mud Cloth - Source: British Museum

Mud Cloth - Source: British Museum

Mud Cloth (or bogolanfini): a distinctive fabric made by the Bamana peoples of Mali, West Africa. They are made into men's sleeveless loose tops and women's wrap-around skirts (tafe).
Source:  British Museum


Sapeur in the Bacongo neighborhood. Source: NPR "The Surprising Sartorial Culture Of Congolese 'Sapeurs'"

Sapeur in the Bacongo neighborhood. Source: NPR "The Surprising Sartorial Culture Of Congolese 'Sapeurs'"

Sape, La or Sapeur: La Societe des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Elegantes, or the Society of Tastemakers and Elegant People, and its member, Sapeur found in Brazzaville, the capital of the Republic of Congo. Sapeurs are ordinary Congolese men who dress up in tailored suits and well-polished shoes to walk around the streets of Brazzaville and meet up with each other.